Imogene Remus – The Ghost of Eden Park

Imogene Remus - The Ghost of Eden Park

A well known and rather impressive urban park, Eden Park is located in the Walnut Hills and Mt. Adams areas of Cincinnati, Ohio.

The park land was bought up by the city in 1869 – before this a prominent Cincinnati landowner (who was also a horticulturist) named Nicholas Longworth owned it.

Longworth obviously had a lot of affection for the area as he frequently referred to it as his ‘Garden of Eden’. Reports suggest that he used the land as a vineyard.

It is rumored that the park is haunted by the ghost of a lady known as Augusta “Imogene” Remus. She was the unfortunate second wife of a notorious bootlegger named George Remus


Love Blossoms

Imogene initially met George Remus in Chicago when she was a regular to one of his numerous pharmacies. George seemed to see something in Imogene, and before long, he offered her the position of being his own legal secretary.

Both Imogene and George were married when they met, Imogene eventually left her husband in 1917 and George got divorced from his wife shortly afterwards. Remus and Imogene then got married on June the 25th, in Newport, KY.

Eden Park Sign

In January of 1920 the Alcohol Prohibition act came into play and George instantly spotted a loophole in it’s setup. He was able to buy alcohol for his pharmacies through ‘medicinal purposes’.

He then paid a group of his own employees to raid each delivery so he could sell the drink illegally.

George and Imogene eventually moved to Cincinnati where his illegal booze business snowballed – some reports suggest that he was worth in excess of forty million dollars!


Caught

But it wasn’t all plain sailing – in 1925, George Remus was indicted for thousands of violations of the Volstead Act. He ended up having to serve a two year sentence in prison.

When he knew the game was up, and he was going to serve a sentence, Remus handed power of attorney to his wife, Imogene, and transferred all assets to her name.

Unfortunately, he made the mistake of letting this information slip in front of an undercover agent inmate named Franklin Dodge.

Dodge decided to quit his undercover position and started an affair with Imogene.

The pair really seemed to know what they were doing – they immediately liquidated Remus’ assets and hid the money for themselves.

Remus was left with little over $100 of his own empire!

Dodge and Imogene then went as far as trying to get the bootlegger deported from the country…but that attempt failed. They then hired a ‘hit man’ to take Remus out…but that also failed.


Revenge

George was finally released in 1927 and Imogene at once filed for divorce. On October 6th, 1927, both Imogene and George were to attend court for the finalization of the divorce.

When Imogene was on her way to court she was unaware that George was following her car – a chase ensued ending up with Imogene’s car crashing into a barrier at Eden Park.

She exited the car and desperately tried to get away from her enraged husband…but he shot her in the abdomen and she died near the Spring House Gazebo.

Mirror Lake, Eden Park

Remus’s chauffeur had seen all this happen, and decided to make a bolt for it…leaving George stranded in the park next to the body of his dead wife.

Remus then calmly walked to the nearest police station and turned himself in for the murder of his wife.

When he eventually got to trial he decided to represent himself. He pleaded not guilty on the grounds of insanity – caused by the adultery, thievery, and betrayal of his wife.

He was ultimately acquitted in one of the first successful cases of the insanity defence – he ended up serving 8 months in a mental asylum.

By the time he was released, the underground bootlegging industry had been taken over by the ‘real’ gangsters – George never returned to this business.


Imogene Remus

Ever since her murder, there have been numerous reports of Imogene’s ghost being spotted in Eden Park. She is often seen in and around the gazebo she was murdered by.

Eyewitness accounts have her wearing a black gown as she cries silently by the gazebo. She has also been spotted by the nearby reflecting pool throughout the Autumn months – standing silently and gazing at the tree-leaves hitting the water.

If you have any thoughts or opinions on the subject we have covered here today, please leave them in the comment section below.

Haunted Houses In Cincinnati, Ohio

Haunted Houses in Cincinnati Ohio

Do you find castles, hayrides or graveyards filled with phony ghosts, weapons, chainsaws and mazes amusing? Are you done with the monotony of life and are looking forward to experiencing real paranormal activity?

Do deaths, gore, torture and spookiness give you an Adrenalin rush? You, my friend, are one of those adventurous folks who love to dig into weird mysteries of the world.

Join us at one of the creepiest ghost hunts in some of the most haunted houses in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Top 5 Haunted Houses In Cincinnati, Ohio…

1) Stenton House:

The Dutch built Stenton House in 1850. This eerie Victorian mansion witnessed the suicide of a Dutchman and two young pupils.

The past occupants of the building have reported ghostly apparitions, spooky sounds of objects hitting the floor on the topmost story and phantom footsteps.

After the Second World War, the mansion was subdivided into multi-unit dwellings known as the Cornell Place Apartments.

As of now, the owners use this property as private residence. Some apartments were sealed for safety purposes.

Guest tours and photography is discouraged because the government respects the privacy of its corporeal as well as spiritual residents.

2) Tracy’s Home on Dunham Road, Amelia:

The Tracy family occupied this farmhouse during 1802 to 1803. A group of native Indians called Cherokees from the surrounding woods raided the house in that period.

The riot resulted in sudden death of the youngest girl of the Tracy family. Since then, her spirit has been chasing people away.

Cincinnati Ohio

In 2005, the descendants renovated the house for visitors. Some parts of it are open for tours while rest of the house is restricted for the guests.

3) McClung House:

A sweet little deserted house on the Main Street with a dark history of homicide. Who wouldn’t want to explore it?

The McClung House built in 1870 had no supernatural history until 1901, when two lovebirds by the name of John and Rebecca McClung moved there.

John was a jealous, aggressive and dominating character. He forbade Rebecca from mingling with the neighbors. She was not allowed to go outside without his permission. Often, the people saw Rebecca sitting by their bedroom window, admiring the outside scenery.

Downtown Cincinnati from Devou Park in Covington

One day the neighbors heard her pleas for help. When the police arrived at the crime scene, they found John with a bloody log by the mutilated corpse of Rebecca.

However, John was later acquitted due to lack of substantial evidence. After the incident, many folks have seen Rebecca’s spirit walking around the graveyard.

A few neighbors have seen her sitting by the same window. She is still upset because John was not convicted for her murder.

4) Chambers Road House:

A deserted house in shambles, with unkempt lawn and a messy barn sets out the mood for a horror story. There are plenty of stories floating around this “supposedly” haunted place.

Two decades ago, a family of five occupied the house. The husband was mentally sick and as per the local tales, he shot his wife, two kids and horses occupying the barn. The youngest one escaped to a nearby tunnel. The father, who later committed suicide, eventually murdered him.

There are reports of ghostly sightings in the house, the barn and the nearby tunnel. You can see a few bullet holes and dry blood splattered across the walls.

The unnatural aura surrounding this place attracts ghost hunters and paranormal experts from all over the world. Some of them reported peculiar sounds like neighs, screams and gunshots after the sunset.

If you want to explore this place, be a little cautious and make sure, you are never alone!

5) The Handlebar Ranch:

Tiny Town AKA Munchkinville, formally known as the Handlebar Ranch has nothing to do with black magic, witches or murders, just a bunch of pissed off retired midgets.

It is a village of evil circus dwarfs, located towards the north of Cincinnati, near Mt. Rumpke. Like some bad rural myths, the stories surrounding this village pass on from one generation to another.

Annie and Percy Ritter, the last living owners of the house died in late 1990s. Although we’re not sure where the midget rumors started, but Annie’s barely 5-feet-tall frame and unfriendly attitude towards teenagers might have something to do with it.

In 2002, this 30-acre piece was transferred to the Rumpke. At present, the place is in mess. All that remains of it is cemented walls, lonely wooden bridge, crematory, the wagon wheel gate and a church for devil worshipers.

We don’t recommend trespassing, unless you want to irritate the midgets.

With this, we complete our list of the top five haunted houses in Cincinnati, Ohio. They go beyond the bogus Halloween homes and incite true fear in the hearts of the bravest men. Do remember to visit them!