The Delhi Purple Sapphire (The Gem of Sorrow)

The Delhi Purple Sapphire (The Gem of Sorrow)

During my recent research for an upcoming article I stumbled across a subject I had heard little about before – a few small snippets here and there online, but nothing more!

Turns out The Delhi Purple Sapphire was also known as The Gem of Sorrow – this was probably the reason I was unable to locate much information on the subject (Google gets fussy like that sometimes!).

Anyway, this cursed object is strangely different to most other paranormal objects – it does not bring death…but hoards of sorrow…


It’s Arrival in England

In 1857 the cursed stone was brought to British shores. It was discovered in India by an English cavalry man named Ferris.

Ferris claimed he had managed to get his hands on the stone by taking it from an ancient temple during an Indian uprising.


Bad, Bad Luck…

From the moment Ferris took the strange stone, his life (and the life of his son) seemed to dive into a downward spiral.

They both lost huge amounts of their wealth whilst their health seemed to get worse by the week (they seemed to catch virus after virus).

The Cursed Delhi Purple Sapphire

Both men blamed the the Delhi Purple Sapphire for their change in fortunes. The gem was eventually removed from the family and sold on to Edward Heron


Heron’s Despair

In 1890 Edward Heron Allen took possession of the Gem of Sorrow. It wasn’t long before he experienced the same fate as the Ferris boys!

Soon after Edward took possession of the purple sapphire he also lost the majority of his fortune.

He apparently publicly blamed the cursed stone and was often furious at social events – always claiming the stone was the working of the devil and it was the sole reason he was failing in life.

Heron eventually had enough of his misfortune – he grabbed the stone in a fit of rage and tossed it far out into the regent’s canal.

He thought that was the last he would ever see of the cursed object…

A week later a local jeweler turned up on Heron’s doorstep with the stone in his possession. He claimed a mysterious stranger had fished it out of the canal and sold it on to him.

The jeweler handed the cursed stone back to Heron.


Protection

Enough was enough – in 1904 Edward Heron decided to study the art of white magic in an attempt to protect himself from the stone.

He locked the purple sapphire in a box that was full of magic sigils and protective talismans, and entombed this box within seven other boxes.

He dug a deep, deep hole in his property’s basement and buried it as deep as it would go!

Following Edward Heron’s eventual death, the stone was dug up from his cellar and donated to the British museum.

If you have any thoughts or opinions on the subject we have covered here today, please leave them in the comment section below.