Lady Lovibond – The Ghost Ship Mystery

Lady Lovibond – The Ghost Ship Mystery

In this article we will be taking a closer look at the strange paranormal case of the ‘ghost ship’ named Lady Lovibond. The triple-masted schooner ended up being run aground on the shifting sands at Goodwin due to feelings of love and jealousy…

But apparently, this was not it’s last voyage…


The Valentine’s Day Voyage

Captain Simon Reed arranged a trip on the Lady Lovibond in 1748 as a honeymoon gift for his new wife, a beautiful lady named Annetta. The trip was due to travel along the River Thames towards the open sea towards the sunnier climes of Portugal.

The first evening of the voyage was pretty much a full on party, with people drinking and and having fun on all levels of the ship.

Everyone seemed to be enjoying themselves and getting drunk…except for one man named John Rivers


John Rivers

John had actually served as best man at the Captain and Annetta’s wedding, and was the first mate aboard the Lady Lovibond. Rivers was apparently secretly in love with Annetta, and jealously had slowly turned into fury when he realised he could not have her.

Six miles off the Deal coast, not far from the Straits of Dover, is a geological feature known as the Goodwin Sands. This feature is known to have claimed numerous sea vessels over the centuries.

John Rivers had basically cracked – his love struck emotions turned murderous, and he decided to steer the ship into the Goodwin Sands.

The Ghost Ship


The Ghost Ship

Five decades on to the day of the Lady Lovibond tragedy, the skipper of another vessel, the Edenbridge, had a strange encounter with a VERY similar ship.

The captain’s name was James Westlake, and his log tells us that his ship almost collided with another vessel with a trio of masts. Apparently the schooner came so close to the Edenbridge that the captain could actually hear the celebrations of a party taking place on board.

On the 13th February and fifty years after this sighting there was another. Locals living near the Goodwin Sands noticed a ship going out of control and heading straight into the infamous Sands.

Similar reports were made in 1898 of an identical incident.

Rescue missions attended both of these strange incidents, but on both occasions, no wreckage was found!

The final report to be filed was made in 1948 by a Captain Bull Prestwick. He bumped into the ‘ghost ship’ on the seas and at first thought it was a real vessel. He did however note, that the ship gave off a strange eerie green glow.

In 1998 a load of sea vessels headed out in the hope that they would catch a glimpse of the ghost of Lady Lovibond…but for some reason it did not show up. Maybe the Lady Lovibond has finally made peace with it’s history?

If you have any thoughts or opinions on the subject we have covered here today, please leave them in the comment section below.


Japanese Ghost Ships

Japanese Ghost Ships

Back in 2015, eleven wooden boats washed up on the coast of northern Japan over a eight week period. This article takes a look at the so-called Japanese ghost ships and the possible reasons behind their unfortunate end…


The Discovery

This report was first released online back in December of 2015, when Coast Guard officials admitted that they were left scratching their heads over the strange discovery.

Eleven boats were, filled with decomposing corpses, were found found floating in Japanese waters over a two month period.

The Discovery

In all, remains of twenty five individuals were found aboard the eleven sea vessels that popped up on the coast of northern Japan.


The Theories Behind The Japanese Ghost Ships

A handful of the sea-battered vessels bore Korean characters – were these vessels fishing transport that was unable to return to their ports in North Korea?

Authorities also think that the people on board could of been defectors from the closed off country – trying their best to escape the twisted regime and make a new life for themselves elsewhere (somewhere safer!).

An alternative theory points to the fact that the boat’s engines could have been experiencing malfunctions due to poor weather conditions – resulting in their crew members dying at sea.

The Theories Behind The Japanese Ghost Ships

There is one rather gruesome twist to this report though – two of the bodies were found without heads, whilst one of the sea vessels contained six skulls…

If you have any thoughts or opinions on the subject covered here today, please leave them in the comment section below.